How to move to NYC: A crash course guide to finding an apartment

Welcome to Brick Undergrounds favorite stories of 2019: Summer edition

Want to buy a New York City co-op or condo apartment for your (grown) child? Heres how to do it

9 ways to negotiate your rent when renewing your lease

How NYCs new rent reforms affect you even if youre not a stabilized tenant: A blacklist ban, security deposit limit, & more

How to move to NYC: A crash course guide to finding an apartment

Welcome to Brick Undergrounds favorite stories of 2019: Summer edition

How to sell your home and buy a new one at the same time: A New York City survival guide

Here are the NYC apartments for sale with the deepest price chops in July

How to move to NYC: A crash course guide to finding an apartment

Brick Undergrounds 2019 guide to co-living spaces in NYC: How to tell the communal disruptors apart

Welcome to Brick Undergrounds favorite stories of 2019: Summer edition

Banish the garish wallpaper, open up the kitchen, and other upgrades for a Forest Hills fixer-upper

Dear Ms. Demeanor: Everyone in our building has a different opinion about our lobby reno. Help!

The documents you need when renovating in NYC

A house in a private community in Rehoboth Beach, DE, for $800,000

A house near the Long Island Sound and close to the North Fork, for $550,000

5 houses in St. Louis, Missouri, one of the U.S.s most pet-friendly cities

Q. I recently applied for an apartment with a broker, but lost the unit to another applicant.  It was an open listing.  I found a different apartment in the same building, but its listed with a different broker.

Is it all right for me to reach out and apply for this second apartment with the other broker or would I be violating the brokerage fee agreement that I signed with my first agent?

A. An open listing means that any agent can advertise the listing and bring their client directly to the landlord or management company. There is no listing broker, and the fact that one agent advertises a property does not entitle them to be involved in its rental.

If the first apartment you saw was indeed an open listing, then it is likely that the other available unit in the building is also an open listing that your first broker can show you as well. You would need to review the fee agreement that you signed to know if you would incur the brokerage commission by renting in the building through another broker.    Many fee agreements require you to pay the broker a fee if you rent an apartment in a building they brought you to within a certain period of time.

Mike Akerlyis a New York City real estate attorney, landlord, and real estate broker.He is also the publisher of the Greenwich Village blogVillageConfidential.

Find a great agent with BrickUndergrounds Agent Referral Service

Brick Underground articles occasionally include the expertise of, or information about, advertising partners when relevant to the story. We will never promote an advertisers product without making the relationship clear to our readers.

Learn from these first-time renovators mistakes

Introducing Brick Undergrounds Gross Rent Calculator: How to figure out the rent youll actually owe each month

Whats the best way to find a NYC apartment BEFORE its listed for sale?

How to make your NYC apartment quieter and give your ears a break

This Midtown East one bedroom has room to spare, plus a view of the UN

2,800 immigrant families in NYC could be displaced, the impervious 6 percent broker commission, & more

Renovating a house in NYC? Dont fall for these 8 common myths

*By signing up you agree to receive occasional emails on behalf of our sponsors

*By signing up you agree to receive occasional emails on behalf of our sponsors

Delivered to your inbox twice weekly – for free.